2016-09-30T10:36:49+00:00 2016-09-30T11:36:16+00:00

Valentine's "Her" explores even further dimensions in remix EP


As writers and huge music junkie in general, we come across both great and terrible music on the daily. But despite being fed stand out tracks through our inboxes or Soundcloud feed, one component that seems to be less prominent these days is longevity. In the saturated electronic scene, a track's life span and hype is unfortunately fleeting. This was not the case for Valentine's "Her", whose track completely immersed me in another world upon first listen. When a track has that rare captivating energy, it becomes a staple and might cause one to excessively overplay in your day to day.  Though it's only been a month since the "Her"'s release, I still find myself fiending to listen to it and reimagine the space I'm in, through it's synthetic brushstrokes of sound. Luckily, we're in for a treat with some fresh remixes to give us a new perspective on this instant classic. 

Xavi's take on "Her" is a cinematic breeze of excellence. Taking it on with a poignant ambience, it explodes into a kaleidoscopic cluster in it's corrugated synth work. The crunching dissonance adds a jarring contrast to keep listeners on their toes. The remix concludes with a distant echo and transient ruffles and raindrops to add to the beauty of it's imperfection. Xavi's remix of "Her" is an electronic odyssey, embracing emotions both high and low.

The Halpe remix takes on a perky more vaporwave and glitch inspired tonality. It begins with playful twinkles and heavy drum work. Out of the no where, Halpe reels in a sick trap-inspired drop. If I were to visualize the track with all it's bird chirps and clunky percussion present, I envision a vast neon jungle landscape. Imagine if the primitive world somehow made ties with the sporadic nature of technology, Halpe's rendition of "Her" would be the soundtrack. 

Adding a cheerful nu-disco twist, NRMN chops up and blends the vocals to kawaii perfection. The funky beat is undeniably danceable as it's perkiness throughout is reminiscent of retro video games. NRMN, who's artwork reflects the simplicity and nostalgia of Nintendo, surely implements this inspiration in his take of "Her". The outro ends with a bittersweet harp flute insert. The sweet melody would seemingly pair with the conclusion of a character's quest in a video game, with it's timbre depicting a sense of contentment. 

Lastly, blake skowron brings "Her" into an alternate universe", through an experimental formation of frequencies. Taking industrial clicks and having them descend into it's original melody creates a jarring tension. The producer explores a darker, wonkier side to the original. Subtle glitches and hard-hitting synths create for an extremely inventive work, showcasing blake skowron's ability as a trap music renegade by breaking all the boundaries. 

Connect with VALENTINE:  Facebook | Soundcloud | Twitter
Connect with XaviFacebook | Twitter | Soundcloud
Connect with halpe:  Twitter | Soundcloud
Connect with NRMN: Twitter | Soundcloud
Connect with blake skowronFacebook | Twitter | Soundcloud


Electronic · Uncategorized


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