2014-11-10T07:26:42+00:00 2015-10-23T05:56:56+00:00

Talking 'Iffy': Recondite in Conversation

recondite

If there's anyone bringing soul and emotion back to techno, there's no denying that Bavarian native, Lorenz Brunner, a.k.a. Recondite accomplishes just that. With an incredible year full of releases for labels like Dystopian, Hotflush, and Innervisions it's not hard to tell that the often melancholious sound Recondite chases in his musical narrative is unique, soul clenching, and highly sought after within today's electronic music scene. A refreshing dose of meditative and reflective sounds on stage and in the studio constantly earns him deserving time-slots at venues and festivals around the globe – and things are about to get more interesting as we near the release of his third full-length effort, Iffy. After wrapping up his mini west coast tour in North America EARMILK was able to catch Brunner on some very limited downtime to talk a little regarding his new record for Innervisions.

EARMILK: You’ve touched down on North American grounds a couple of times the latter portion of the year and just played again in Guadalajara, Los Angeles and NYC. How was the reception for these gigs?
RECONDITE: What should I say other than VERY GOOD? No, but really – I think I have a good connection to the crowds over here. It is always a lot of fun to play here. The receptions and crowds are different than in Europe, but not in a bad way at all. I feel a big appreciation here actually.
EM: A year ago you released your second album – Hinterland – on Ghostly International. This time around, you’ve decided to release your third LP on Innervisions. What made this imprint the right fit for the record?
R: First of all, the great connection to DIXON and AME. We played together a lot this year and we share a certain musical taste. The label is in the same town as I live and it s very well respected – as they do a great job, so these are some important factors.
EM: What kind of thoughts and emotions were present while formulating Iffy?
R: As I made the sketches for the album almost 95% while traveling, I think there are very present and up to date emotions displayed which I had in the recent months. it is a deep insight in to my momentary state of mind: Sometimes happy, sometimes sad – always melancholic. Sometimes fragile ,sometimes strong – never too sure about anything. Sometimes convinced, sometimes conflicted, but always deep.
EM: What was the most difficult and special part about the album’s process? Were there any tracks in specific that came about new methods?
R: It certainly was a challenge to make it while touring. Good noise canceling headphones helped me. Of course, I mixed down all the tracks in the studio, but like I said, the ideas were made on the road or in the air.
EM: There’s definitely a chunk of hip-hop in Iffy with specific tracks like ‘Tame’ and ‘Buteo’ really sounding off the more beat making pioneers you often note like MF Doom and J Dilla. I can’t help to also feel a faint connection between your music and that of current west coast beat maker, Teebs of Brainfeeder. 
R: That you say this actually makes me really happy. There is a strong connection to the sound you described. I would say it was my biggest musical input in my teenager years. I'm glad that it s still audible a little bit in my music. I'm actually working on projects that reflect that influence more just at this moment.
EM: Time slows down early on in Iffy as it heads towards the record’s midpoint. The slow-moving pace fluctuates from being tense and relaxing – often keeping the listener attentive and conscious. It’s a nice contrast from the fast-paced and technological era we live in. What inspires this slower narrative in your music?
R: This just comes from a very strong antipathy to stressful, fast and hectic music. I always need to have a little bit of a mellow feel to all of my tracks, but equipped with enough energy to touch you physically as well. I probably would not like my music otherwise. Also, when I play in clubs for crowds that demand very aggressive and fast music, I won’t deliver that. I would rather  try and work the crowd with emotions they might have not heard in the club environment before. I'm glad that it usually works, but of course there are certain people who like it more and some less.
EM: There is a certain commitment required as a listener that forces one to be in the moment. The record won’t necessarily send you overboard and it’s not really an album to go to sleep to. You take the listener out of leisure and place them in the driver’s seat. Is there a sense of self-awareness to be attained?
R: Yes. I think it's just a really good reflection of my current mind states related to my lifestyle with lots of travels and therefore a lot of emotional changes and cultural changes with variables that you cannot control. Lots of uncertain things that demand your attention. The best way of handling this for me is to stay cool and mellow, yet aware and in shape. I think the album was the biggest emotional valve I've ever had in a piece of music I made. I think it s the most personal and up to date I've ever done as it features mind states from recent months that got transferred into music instantly on the go.
EM: What’s next for Recondite in 2015?
R: There will be a remix for Mind Against on Life&Death, and a new release on ACID TEST. I'm also planning on doing another Plangent record too!

 Watch Recondite's new self-directed video for "Levo" below and don't forget to purchase your copy of Iffy available at all good record shops November 11th. 

 

 


 

recondite-iffy-IV

Recondite

Iffy

  • 2014-11-11
  • Innervisions

 

Categories:
Electronic · Feature · Interview · Techno

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